Saturday, January 12, 2008

How Can We Teach Civic Education Effectively?

By: Diane Palmer, Massachusetts Coordinator, We the People Programs

Title: How Can We Teach Civic Education Effectively?

Authors: Diane Palmer, Massachusetts Coordinator, We the People Programs

Publish: Presented for the conference on “Education and Democracy in the Americas” San Jose, Costa Rica, August 18-19, 2005.

Abstract: Civic education in any of its forms may be the most important aspect of education related to achieving and maintaining world peace. Certainly, without a civic-educated citizenry, democracy cannot be maintained. It seems to me that democracy, or representative democracy, in its many variations is the one system that is designed to achieve liberty, equality, and justice. There is no better place to form competent citizens than in schools. It would be great to say that knowledgeable citizens disposed to participate in their government or society can be formed at any time. However, William Damon of the Center on Adolescence at Stanford University determined that civic identity, an allegiance to a set of moral and political beliefs, is formed during adolescence, along with personal and social skills. (2001) Since most young people are in school at this age, school should be the place where citizenship or civic education is strongest. For over thirty years, Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup has been polling the American public to ascertain the most important issues for schooling. In every poll “educating young people for responsible citizenship” comes out overwhelmingly as one of the primary goals of schools. (Branson, 2001)

Documentacion asociada al contenido

Palmer_2005.pdf
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